Reading Resources for Your Classroom

encourage reading, student, reading, bookFostering a love for stories and reading is one of the most important things a teacher can instill in their students. Stories tell us about far-off places, different people, and other times not only spark the imagination, but help readers develop a deeper sense of empathy and understanding. With that in mind, we found these three free online reading resources you can share with your students.

3 Reading Resources for Your Classroom

  1. International Children's Digital Library: This library has extensive search categories such as language, length, ages, picture books, and more. The site houses tons of reading material from all around the world. This material includes everything from fairy tales from around the world to workbooks. In International Children's Digital Library's mission statement they say their goal “…is to build a collection of books that represents outstanding historical and contemporary books from throughout the world. Ultimately, the Foundation aspires to have every culture and language represented so that every child can know and appreciate the riches of children's literature from the world community.”
  2. students who love readingLibriVox Audio Books Free: This free app offers access to thousands of audio books in any genre. Volunteers take public domain books and record, edit, and distribute the audio book version. Audio books can be useful for struggling readers, auditory learners, and for adding another layer of depth to a story. Every audio book can be streamed over the internet or downloaded for later use.
  3. Google Books: This Google tool allows you to search any book and find an online copy to read in either a full-text version or a preview. It also offers an advanced search option where you can search based on title, author, language, and even phrases. Each book has a link and an embed code, so it is easy to share with your students. It also allows you to take a screenshot of the text from the book that can be shared the same way. This feature can be useful for close-reading projects. You can also create reading lists for “To read,” “Have read,” “Favorites,” and more.

What reading resources do you use in your classroom? Have you used one of these tools and have tips or comments to share? Let us know what you think in the comments below!

 

About the Author
Carolina Fransen is the EdTech Apps and Tools Editor at SimpleK12.com. She writes regularly about the use of educational technology in K-12 classrooms and she loves investigating teaching jobs in some of her favorite locales. If you have an app, tool, website, or service that you think we should know about, please send your information or tip to editor@simplek12.com.