5 Summer Reads that Adults Can Enjoy

Summer readSome books seem to be staples in education that every student will read before they graduate. Although many of us have read these same books when we were young, they have powerful, pertinent messages that can still affect us today. For this list, we’re sharing some popular summer reads for students that adults can still relate to and enjoy.

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson – This winner of the Newbery Medal is filled with all the things that make up a good kid’s book: adventure, fantasy, and friendship. However, it also explores heavier areas such as coping with the loss of a friend and the stages of grief; making it applicable to readers of all ages.

The Giver by Lois Lowry – Another winner of the Newbery Medal, this book tells the story of Jonah: a young boy who is selected to carry all the memories of the past in his sterile society. Through his experiences he begins to understand what his community, devoid of all emotion, is missing and that without the experience of pain, one cannot truly know joy.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee – This book is considered an American Classic and addresses difficult points of contention from the life of the young narrator, Scout. The narrator’s father, Atticus Finch, is often referred to as “The Greatest Hero in Literature,” as he tries to be a good example to his children and stay true to his convictions despite pressure from their community.

The Diary of Anne Frank – This powerful diary of a young girl is usually read in later middle school years, or even high school. As a hideaway, Anne leads a life that in many ways is not typical to the average 13-year old. However, Anne is wise beyond her years and provides nuggets of truth that children and adults can appreciate.

Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger – Due to its language and some suggestive material, this book is generally saved for high school reads. With Holden Caulfield, Salinger created one of the most distinctive voices in literature. Holden is relatable to every student who feels like an outcast, but this coming of age story also deals with heavier topics such as depression, neglect, and the desire to protect innocence.

What are some of your favorite summer reads? What children's or young adult books do you feel have relatable messages for adults? Let us know in the comments below!

Check out this article for ideas about a summer project for your students.

Carolina Fransen is the EdTech Apps and Tools Editor at SimpleK12.com. She writes regularly about the use of educational technology in K-12 classrooms. If you have an app, tool, website, or service that you think we should know about, please send your information or tip to editor@simplek12.com.