Do you make these homework assumptions?

Homework assumptions. We all make them sometimes. Thankfully, I found a tweet that might help. I watch social media closely and it's my job to share some of the hot topics on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and other outlets that teachers, principals, students, and parents are contributing.

As teachers, we sometimes make assumptions when planning our classes. This is especially true when concerning homework. Dr. Justin Tarte posted a tweet about this recently, bringing some of these assumptions to light. Some of these assumptions are basic, such as assuming students care enough to complete the assignment. Others that Dr. Tarte listed are quite jarring, such as assuming students have a home or parents with the correct language skills to help with the assignment. It's a good thing to keep this all in mind when assigning homework to students. You can see the list below.

homework assumptions

One way you can work around these assumptions is by asking students if they're struggling with completing any of the assignments. Make it so students can answer privately by either writing the issue down or giving them an option to speak with you before or after class. After finding out the student's specific situation, you can make arrangements to work around the issue such as finding the student a mentor if their parents can't help, or making sure the library stays open so students can access a safe working environment after class.

Have  you ever made these assumptions? Did this article miss any? Have you ever ran into any of these problems? How did you solve them?

Tori Pakizer is the Social Media Editor at SimpleK12.com. She writes regularly about the use of educational technology in K-12 classrooms, and specializes in how teachers use Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and other social media. You can follow Tori and SimpleK12 on Twitter @SimpleK12. If you have ideas for using social media in schools, please send your information or tip to editor@simplek12.com.