Students Need Book Report Help? Try Using Literary Criticism.

Do your students ever ask you for help about where to start on their writing assignments? Or on how to vary from their standard assignment approach? Why not suggest they try using literary criticism? I found this suggestion on social media and I wanted to share it with all of you. I watch social media closely and it's my job to share some of the hot topics on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and other outlets that teachers, principals, students, and parents are contributing.

Are your students struggling to find topics for various writing assignments? Literary criticisms might be the answer. Alex Corbitt posted an infographic, created by Tim Gillespie, on his Twitter account. The infographic defines literary criticism quickly and efficiently. A literary criticism is a lens through which a person can examine a story. For example, a person reading a novel through a historical criticism lens will pay special attention to how the time period shapes the story, characters, and themes. The infographic lists 8 major categories. You can see them below.

literary criticism

If a student is struggling with a project, you can advise they pick one of the literary criticisms listed above. By selecting a criticism, you help them round down their topic and give them a way to start thinking critically about the assignment.

What other ways have you helped students select a topic for a writing assignment? Have you ever used literary criticisms in the classroom before?

Tori Pakizer is the Social Media Editor at SimpleK12.com. She write regularly about the use of educational technology in K-12 classrooms, and specializes in how teachers use Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and other social media. You can follow Tori and SimpleK12 on Twitter @SimpleK12. If you have ideas for using social media in schools, please send your information or tip to editor@simplek12.com.