The unsung women in STEM

It was recently International Day of Women & Girls in Science, so people took to Twitter to acknowledge the wonderful (and often overlooked) contributions from women in STEM jobs. I watch social media closely and it's my job to share some of the hot topics on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and other outlets that teachers, principals, students, and parents are contributing. So I compiled a list of some of these amazing women here so you can learn about them yourself and tell your students.

1.) Dr. Mica Endsley
The US Air Force promoted their first female Air Force Chief Scientist, Dr. Mica Endsley.

women in stem mica endsley

2.) Margaret Hamilton
A world without Margaret Hamilton is one where man never landed on the moon or invented software.

women in stem margaret hamilton

3.) Mae Jeminson
Real Simple Magazine honored Mae Jeminson who was the first African-American female astronaut.

women in stem mae jeminson

4.) Hedy Lamarr
You have to wonder if there's something Hedy Lamarr couldn't do. Not only did she mesmerize people as an actress, but her efforts to combat Nazi's during World War II were essential in creating mobile and wireless technology.

women in stem hedy lamarr

5.) Jane Goodall
Well, you knew this one was coming, didn't you? The Sierra Club honored Jane Goodall for changing how the world saw chimpanzees.  (One of my all-time favorites!)

women in stem jane goodall

Who is your favorite woman in STEM? Please share any their name and story below and help this list grow.

Tori Pakizer is the Social Media Editor at SimpleK12.com. She writes regularly about the use of educational technology in K-12 classrooms, and specializes in how teachers use Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and other social media. You can follow Tori and SimpleK12 on Twitter @SimpleK12. If you have ideas for using social media in schools, please send your information or tip to editor@simplek12.com.