Capture the attention of your students by using videos in the classroom.

8 Clever Ways to Use Videos in the Classroom

ClassHook identifies videos to support your lesson plans. These aren't just any videos — they come from popular media sources your students will recognize. Students often have short attention spans, and using educational clips from popular TV shows and movies keep students interested.

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TedEd offers inspirational video clips for the classroom. I love the variety of topics and resources available at TedEd. Art, Health, Science, Social Studies — there is something for everyone available on this site. In addition to the video itself, you'll find multiple-choice quiz questions, discussion questions, and more ideas to help integrate each video into your lessons.

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Adobe Spark allows you to create your own videos, graphics, or web stories in minutes. You and your students can add in just about any type of media you'd like to your finished product — text, audio, video, or photos.

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The Smithsonian Channel is a favorite video resource for many educators. When you're kicking off a new lesson on a period of history, sometimes you want to get students thinking creatively. Have them ask themselves, “What if this event never occurred?” or “What if this individual was never born?” These Smithsonian videos are a perfect way to prompt students to ask deeper questions about a historical event or period.

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The Discovery Network's YouTube Channel has plenty of videos perfect for engaging students of all levels in science and engineering topics. Making connections to the real world is an essential part of hooking students at the beginning of a lesson. The Discovery Network's YouTube channel has video clips from favorite television shows, and many of them have educational value. You can share videos about ecosystems from around the world, or watch people hard at work in science-related fields. This resource makes it easy to find a quick clip with your class.

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Keynote turns slide slows into movies in a matter of minutes. If you've made a terrific Keynote presentation, why not turn it into a movie?

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Use Adobe Spark to create a public service announcement. Let's take another look at Adobe Spark video, and learn how you can design your own public service announcement straight from your web browser. This tool lets teachers or students record their voice and combine media. The final product can be shared online or saved as a movie file.

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Flocabulary helps students master new topics by infusing hip-hop songs and videos with academic content. Along with each video clip, Flocabulary also provides a review, lyrics, printable activities, quizzes, teacher guides, and more. These supporting materials make a huge difference when you're integrating these videos into your lesson plans. All in all, the process is seamless and you'll save time having it all at your fingertips.

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8 Clever Ways to Use Videos in the Classroom Click to Tweet

Interested in more ways to use videos in the classroom? These resources from SimpleK12's Teacher Learning Community will help:

Best Ways to Integrate Video into Your Classroom. On average, students between the ages of 5 and 16 spend 6.5 hours on a screen per day. How can we harness this medium for capturing student attention in the classroom? Explore the immersive learning potential that video has, including virtual field trips, video game integration, and interactive debates.

Ready to Differentiate: Ways to Share Your Screencasts, Videos, and Digital Materials. Do you have screencasts, videos, or other digital materials that you would like to use to help differentiate your lessons, but you aren't sure where to put them? How will you effectively share them with your students and others? And how do you help to ensure that different learners are viewing the materials that are most appropriate to them? Explore several free Web tools that you can use to house and share your screencasts and other supplementary digital materials.

Which idea stood out to you the most? Tell me about it in a comment below.

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About the Author
Kimber Thompson is a Lead Moderator for SimpleK12 webinars and a Contributing Editor for SimpleK12.com. She writes frequently about education topics and is passionate about tools and techniques that inspire young learners. You may reach her with ideas and comments below, and at editor@simplek12.com.